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cj_0512
Active Member

I am thinking about getting a dog and my final two choices are doberman pinscher and german shepherd. Which do you think makes the better pet

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Posted : December 2, 2013 12:45 pm
Juska
Noble Member Pats Friends

That's really up to you. They have different needs and personalities. You should do some research and choose the breed that best fits your lifestyle and energy level. For example, Dobermans don't do well in cold weather, German Shepherds do. It's all a question of what you want in a dog.

Pet parent of Emo the border collie mix and Namira the domestic shorthair cat

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Posted : December 2, 2013 1:43 pm
Jen Jen
Honorable Member

It depends what you want in your pet. GSDs need mental and physical stimulation, so while very loyal they can/will be destructive if not given proper outlet for their energy and smarts. They also can become aggressive to strangers if not given proper socialization and training, which you will have to keep up with regularly.

Dobbies are the better 'family' pet out of the two, I think. At least that has been my experience with them. Probably because they have been bred as more as companions in North Ameica than as utility dogs(which is largely dominated by GSDs and similar). They are also a breed that needs a good outlet for energy both physical and mental, though. They are not a good cold weather dog.

My opinin would be North American lines of Dobbies would make a better companion animal if you're an active person with dog know how.

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Posted : December 2, 2013 1:59 pm
Juska
Noble Member Pats Friends

The "dog know-how" part is VERY important. I would not recommend either of these breeds if this is going to be your first dog.

Pet parent of Emo the border collie mix and Namira the domestic shorthair cat

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Posted : December 2, 2013 2:08 pm
cj_0512
Active Member

No this is not my first dog. I have had many dogs but never a doberman or GSD

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Posted : December 2, 2013 2:19 pm
Ash
 Ash
Admin Admin

That's really up to you. They have different needs and personalities. You should do some research and choose the breed that best fits your lifestyle and energy level. For example, Dobermans don't do well in cold weather, German Shepherds do. It's all a question of what you want in a dog.

I echo what Juska has said here. It really comes down to what you're wanting out of the animal. They are both good dogs in their own ways.

I prefer dobermans, but that's because they are such beautiful dogs and I like what I have read about them. A deterrent for me though is that they shed (I know, I know, all dogs shed, but I don't like the idea of all of these tiny little bristles all over he place). GSDs I've heard shed waaaay worse. I found a GSD running around the highway last year and I got it into my car and took it home until the owner came and got it. The GSD was very well-behaved (it was a police dog in training) and listened to my EVERY order. But my van was COVERED in fur afterwards. It was pretty gross.

These are two of my favorite dogs though. Never had any real experience with either, but they are both very beautiful and appealing. I like their protective instincts.

I'm Fable and Ifrit's mommy. Also mommy to Carousel, Breeze, and a bunch of snakes, lizards, and spiders. Oh, and one amphibian!

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Posted : December 3, 2013 4:45 pm
Juska
Noble Member Pats Friends

German Shepherds are terrible shedders. I know this from both owning one and THE worst case of shedding I've ever dealt with was one:

That wasn't even HALF of it. It was like the owners hadn't brushed her once in the 14 or so years she's been alive.

They need a lot of work (which includes frequent grooming) or else they will most likely become neurotic, destructive, aggressive or all of the above. I've heard too many stories about people just dealing with this unchecked behaviors, like it's normal for the breed to be that way. It's not.

Pet parent of Emo the border collie mix and Namira the domestic shorthair cat

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Posted : December 3, 2013 8:00 pm
cj_0512
Active Member

Yes I have learned from research that german shepherds are terrible shedders. I had a golden retriever and she shed a fair amount. Brushing the dog frequently is not an issue. I have a little bit of experience with GSD's but have never owned one. I have none however with dobermans. My real question is how the dogs generally compare in behavior around people and other dogs as it would be a family dog.

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Posted : December 3, 2013 8:35 pm
Jen Jen
Honorable Member

This is my sole experience with GSDs.

My neighbor's husband got a GSD puppy, and with firm consistant training Kudo was an awesome if very intimdating dog. My neighbor's husband died when Kudo was a year(year and six months?) old, and she locked herself.away.and only saw family for weeks. She dis not reinforce any of Kudo's training for a few weeks and his personalitt change was apparent.

It was a slippery slope after that, which I tried very hard to stop from snowballing. It got to the point I no longer trusted that I could control him(I was the only person he'd listen to). He would only let my neighbor, her close.family, and me into the house(he would aggressivly defend the front door). He was a very well trained dog, and he became a legitimate danger in only a few months time. Consistant, routine training is a must.

Not to scare you away from GSDs as they can make.excellent family pets, but you will always need to on top of proper socialization.

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Posted : December 3, 2013 8:52 pm
cj_0512
Active Member

The dog needs to be good around kids especially. Ill soon be 15 but I have a younger sister who will be interacting with the dog a lot. It will be my family's dog but I will be the primary care giver. We also have other pets that it must be good around.

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Posted : December 3, 2013 9:01 pm
cj_0512
Active Member

This is my sole experience with GSDs.

My neighbor's husband got a GSD puppy, and with firm consistant training Kudo was an awesome if very intimdating dog. My neighbor's husband died when Kudo was a year(year and six months?) old, and she locked herself.away.and only saw family for weeks. She dis not reinforce any of Kudo's training for a few weeks and his personalitt change was apparent.

It was a slippery slope after that, which I tried very hard to stop from snowballing. It got to the point I no longer trusted that I could control him(I was the only person he'd listen to). He would only let my neighbor, her close.family, and me into the house(he would aggressivly defend the front door). He was a very well trained dog, and he became a legitimate danger in only a few months time. Consistant, routine training is a must.

Not to scare you away from GSDs as they can make.excellent family pets, but you will always need to on top of proper socialization.

My neighbors have a GSD and theirs is the only experience I have ever had with this breed. The sad part is that i practically raised her. My neighbors are great people but they just are not good pet owners. They would always go on vacations and were never around for their dog. When this happened I would always look after the dog so the dog started to take to me. My neighbors just can't comprehend that it is their fault and not the dog's. They get mad at the dog whenever it runs away (which happens quite often unfortunately) and in this situation I have to take my bikd out and find her (because I'm only 14 and can't drive). I try to explain to them that having a dog is like having a child and they cant just keep leaving the dog and going on vacation. After almost a year of the dog randomly running away I finally convinced my neighbors to put up a fence in their yard and start treating their dog like another child. The dog is now happier and healthier than before. So my point of sharing this story with you is to say that I understand how hard it can be to watch someone not treat their dog or any animal for that matter properly and I applaud for not letting your neighbors dog turn into a depressed and unloved animal like my neighbors almost did. I just wish that all animal owners realized that animals really are like a second child and need to be treated like one. So sorry to bore you with this long story but like I said I applaud you and there should be more people in this world that get educated before rushing and getting a pet.

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Posted : December 3, 2013 9:17 pm
Jen Jen
Honorable Member

My neighbor.eventually did thw right thing for Kudo and herself, and gave him to close friends with GSD experience(he's doing MUCH better). Glad you stood up your neighor, I never could quite get firm with mine- not like I wanted to. Losing her husband and everything, I never directly called her out until Kudo was really starting to get dangerous.

If you're not completely sold, check this out: http://animal.discovery.com/breed-selec ... reeds.html

If nothing else, it could give you more breed options. I took it, and ended up 100% matched to a breed I'd never considered before. It isn't perfect, but it did make me consider a few breeds I never would have otherwise(I ended up with a terrier mutt from a friend's 'oops' litter).

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Posted : December 3, 2013 9:28 pm
cj_0512
Active Member

I will be sure to check it out. Thanks so much for the input Smile

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Posted : December 3, 2013 9:45 pm
Juska
Noble Member Pats Friends

I think every breed should be treated the same as far as training and interaction goes, no matter what a breed's standard, characteristics or stereotypes may be. I don't really think there are ones more suited to family life than others, as there are so many, and with the right training from the very beginning, you could have almost any dog be a happy house pet without any extreme exercise or training.

For example, people say Pitbulls are great with children. Not every single one is; most would be, I believe, but they need FIRM training in every aspect. I still wouldn't leave any child alone with any dog. Mostly for the dog's safety because young children can be cruel to animals before they learn that other creatures can feel pain. And pain elicits reaction in most cases.

I'd classify Dobies and GSs in this category. I've seen both as well-rounded pets. Maybe Dobies being a little more stubborn with training, but if you're consistent, patient and firm, they'll be fine.

Purchasing from a reputable breeder is also a big part of it. Don't rely on a pet store's stock of puppies if you really want to know the history, health and traits of your dog. You could also rescue, but keep in mind that some rescue dogs may have issues. But they can sometimes be worked through, too.

Personally, I wouldn't want either as a pet (though I have had a GS in the past), but if you're set on choosing one of the two it's your prerogative. If you do find yourself a companion, please post photos and updates so we can all see!

Pet parent of Emo the border collie mix and Namira the domestic shorthair cat

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Posted : December 4, 2013 7:42 am
Jen Jen
Honorable Member

I think every breed should be treated the same as far as training and interaction goes, no matter what a breed's standard, characteristics or stereotypes may be. I don't really think there are ones more suited to family life than others, as there are so many, and with the right training from the very beginning, you could have almost any dog be a happy house pet without any extreme exercise or training.

That is true enough, but there are breeds more suited to certain familes than others. I wouldn't recommend a small, fragile, nippy breed to a family with small grabby children; or a high energy dog to a family of couch potatoes. No level of training will make that a good fit, unless the family drastically changes for the dog.

It's also were speaking directly to your breeder comes in, let them know you want a puppy of the dog they breed, and tell them specifically what you want from your puppy. GSD can and do have high work drive, but if you're looking for a companion your breeder will know you want a more laid back puppy. Kind of the same with Dobbies.

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Posted : December 4, 2013 8:28 am
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