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What animal career lets you do this?

caninesrock
Noble Member

So, I was thinking back to what I want to do with animals and I thought to the people on the wildlife tv shows.

For example, Casey Anderson raises Brutus the Grizzly Bear hands-on. Wiki says his career is a naturalist, but when I looked up naturalist, the job description doesn't sound anything like what Casey Anderson does on his show Wild America or with raising Brutus. All the job sites said a naturalist just takes people on tours at nature centers and educates them about stuff.

Then, there's Jeff Corwin. Wiki lists his career as a "conservationist", whatever that means. I know conservation is a political movement about conserving the natural world, but I didn't know it could be an actual career or what they do. I wouldn't think what Jeff Corwin does would normally fall under it though as I would think it would mainly be things like planting trees, cleaning up litter, etc.

Then, there's Jane Goodall. She's kind of a nut, but she still works or atleast worked with chimpanzees in the wild and directly interacted with them. According to wiki, she's an Ethologist(which is someone who studies animal behavior, mostly in the wild) and Primatology (someone who studies primates.) I'm not interested in studying primates, but ethology sounds interesting. However, since its specifies that most of the time the animals are studied in the wild, I would think Jane Goodall's direct interaction with chimps is more an exception rather than a rule as I can't imagine an ethologist going up to a pack of wolves or pride of lions and directly interacting with them. Usually it seems the animals are studied from a safe distance.

Also, there's Shaun Ellis, whose another nut, but he does work directly with wolves. His job is listed as "Animal Researcher". But when I look it up, its describes as someone who experiments on lab animals. icon-sad And that's definitely not what Shaun does.

And for a more balanced view of people working directly with wolves, the couple, Jim and Jamie Dutcher worked with and lived among a pack of wolves which they made two documentaries about called Living with Wolves and Wolves at Our Doors plus wrote books about it. Jim Dutcher is also listed as a naturalist for his career and I'm not sure about his wife. But again, like stated above, the descriptions of naturalist careers I find on sites don't state anything about them working with animals at all, mostly just at nature centers educating the public.

Then, there's Kevin Richardson who works hands-on with spotted hyenas and African Lions and other big cats. He's listed as being an Animal Behaviorist. This also seems closest to what I want to do, but I'm not sure where you would get hired as one. I don't think zoos have animal behaviorists, but I could be wrong. I'm also certain that even if they do, they probably don't let the behaviorist have direct interactions with the animals since they don't even let zookeepers have direct interactions with the animals.

And there was Steve Irwin in Australia too until he got killed by a stingray. Though, some of the things he did were pretty dangerous and probably not recommended, same as Shaun Ellis with the wolves. His occupations are listed as zoologist, naturalist, and conservationists.

So, my main question is really, would any one of the above listed careers fall under what either a zoologist or wildlife biologist do? Most of what I read about zoologist and wildlife biologist (which I still don't quite understand the difference on) are that they study animals in the wild, but keep a safe distance from them and have no direct interactions. I don't know about wildlife biologists, but I also read that most of the time as a zoologist is not spent with animals, but actually collecting data and writing research papers and only like two months out of the year are actually spent "in the field" so to speak. So, that doesn't really sound like what any of the people listed above do. I read that Casey Anderson graduated with a degree in Wildlife Biology, but Wildlife Biologist isn't listed as being his career, so I don't know?

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Topic starter Posted : July 26, 2016 1:16 pm
Juska
Noble Member Pats Friends

I think what you're looking for is "people with a scientific education/background that got famous". Or, lucky enough to be on a film crew that gets contracted to film wildlife as in Big Cat Diary, etc. I think perhaps the "profession" would be closer to animal behaviorist rather than zoologist or wildlife biologist. You don't need to observe living animals in the wild to study biology, really. I knew someone who went to Africa on a trip to study plant life but that is different, and another person I know went there to study veterinary medicine, I believe. They were there to shadow a wildlife veterinarian treating wild animals (like zebras and such living on a reserve).

These people don't have full time "jobs" per se but they get grants and contracts to study animals for research, papers, studies, etc. like most other scientific professions, only less frequent. Unless they're participating in a study that lasts years there isn't really a steady income just from going out into the bush and watching animals be animals.

I wanted to be like Steve Irwin when I grew up but over the years I realized that you don't just go out and get on TV for catching animals.

Jeff Corwin is a conservationist because he travels worldwide with a conservationist group to infiltrate and stop poaching, illegal animal trade, etc. basically he is spreading the word of illegal animal activity and being proactive by getting animals out of said trades and into rehabilitation centers/back where they belong if possible. He also speaks at schools and other places about it as well.

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Posted : July 26, 2016 1:28 pm
caninesrock
Noble Member

So what kind of college degree would get me into one of these jobs if not zoology or wildlife biology? Are there college degrees specifically for animal behavior (in particular wild animals behavior)? Also, who employs for these jobs? You mentioned grants. Who gives grants and how do you get them?

My main interest not surprisingly, is studying wild canines. It's my dream to study gray wolves (most likely in Yellowstone National Park since that's where their most famous, but I heard that jobs for wolf biologists there, which I assume is the same thing as a wildlife biologist, but not sure, are in very high demand and are hard to come by), red wolves in Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, the pure Eastern Wolves on Algonquin Provincial Park in Canada, Ethiopian Wolves mostly likely in the Bale Mountains National Park in Ethiopia, dholes in either Russia or China or maybe India (but I don't really like the look of the Indian dholes because they're not fluffly like the Chinese or Siberian Dholes since they live in a hot climate),dingos on Fraser Island in Australia, and though probably not likely to have any grants or even projects for them, would be wanting to study golden jackals in Europe or Asia, golden jackals in Africa which are now consider a separate species by some scientists called the African Golden Wolf, Coyotes, Eastern Coyotes/Coywolves, and maybe African Wild Dogs and Spotted Hyenas (not techincally canids, but still interesting and somewhat dog-like) in Africa as well. Would also maybe want to study side-striped and black-backed jackals in the wilds of Africa, but haven't decided yet.

Speaking of, I"m also really interested in taxonomy. Do taxonomists ever directly work with animals at all?

I once had a dream to have my own wildlife show all about canines in the wild, but I know its not likely to ever happen. It was going to be called Wildlife of Dogs. I wanted to travel all over the world filming every species and even some subspecies of wild dogs and have each episode be about a different species of wild dog, but as I said, extremely unlikely to happen unless I got really lucky and got contacted by Nat Geo Wild or Animal Planet (but Animal Planet rarely does documentaries now anyway. It's mostly all reality shows and AR crap :().

However, I realize most of what I wrote above would have little to no hands on stuff. Sometimes wildlife biologist get to hold sedated wolves for weight, medical checks, drawing blood, etc., but that's about it and I don't think it happens very often because otherwise it would be stressful for the animals. Also, sometimes they might be able to pick-up pups from a den unsedated and give them health checks, weight, count the number of pups, etc. , but again, that wouldn't be very often either and I can't imagine they'd be able to do that without first getting the parents away somehow or sedating the parents.

I guess what I really want to do though is like what Jim and Jamie Dutcher did where the lived among a pack of wolves and interacted directly with them, but I'm not sure you can even get a job doing that.

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Topic starter Posted : July 26, 2016 1:53 pm
Juska
Noble Member Pats Friends

Universities, foundations, any large group that would possibly want or need information on something will give a grant to a research team to go out and get that information, or study it, or perform any other task assigned to them. Sometimes the research group or the head of said group will go around asking different places as I mentioned above for grants to do a study. You should read up on the scientific community as a whole if you really want to understand how this works.

You don't just get something like that handed to you once you get a degree or job in any field. Again, just like the zookeeper and other jobs at zoos and such, you're not going to be working directly with animals all that much. And the working with animals part is just the beginning of the work you have to do. You have to record data, recognize patterns, make conclusions, apply the scientific method if performing experiments (think Pavlov's dog), write papers, get your study published and earn credit with the community as a good researcher/scientist.

If you wanted to "work with animals" you'd want to do something like get a degree in marine biology and participate in field studies where you go out and track whale travelling routes, take samples from or tag sharks, observe mating habits of sea lions, dive and observe/collect coral specimens to determine the impact humans are having on natural coral reefs, do a long term study of green sea turtles that come back to the same beach every year to lay eggs, that kind of stuff. You don't really get to pick what you do either. People who do these things are doing it because they are passionate about the science behind it and the knowledge gained from the study or observations. Not just going out and watching animals. And you are probably never going to touch an animal if you get into one of these fields, and study live wild animals. Most of these studies are done with the strict requisite that no human contact is made with the animals in order to preserve a natural environment in which to observe natural behavior. Otherwise your entire study could be flawed and dismissed.

You can go online and take classes that are basically "is this field of science really for you?" experiences, and you will learn what you will be doing and how to do it, during the course of the class. I took a marine megafauna biology class and it was incredibly boring unless you're interested in the trajectory of seals around the island they inhabit and why they do it, nesting habits of sea birds, classifying penguin types and where they live and why they look different, that kind of stuff.

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Posted : July 26, 2016 2:04 pm
caninesrock
Noble Member

I am interested in the scientific study of animals. I love to nerd out about the classifications of wild canids and when new species are proposed and debated such as Eastern Wolves and African Golden wolves, etc. I also like to read about canine behavior in the wild. And I like to read studies about hybridization between different types of canines and other stuff.

Actually, that class you took sounds really interesting to me. I'd much rather have taken a class on penguin types and seal behavior than any of the math classes I had to take in school. That makes me kind of nervous about any kind of science degree though since most of them require alot of different math classes and I'm not very good at math. College alegbra was the only class I failed when I went to college in Florida. I'm not really that interested in marine biology though. I prefer mammalogy.

Also, although the animals are always sedated and you can't really interact with them persay, you do get to touch them.

Here's some examples of biologist touching wild animals (all obviously sedated though except for the pups and cubs):
http://www.opb.org/news/blog/ecotrope/p ... dest-wolf/

Putting a radio collar on a tranquilized wolf

http://wuwm.com/post/wisconsin-wolf-exp ... t#stream/0

A different biologist in a different state holding another wolf that was tranquilized to get a radio collar

http://www.yellowstonegate.com/2015/05/ ... as-wolves/

Not a wolf, but a biologist weighs what seems to be an awake grizzly bear cub, but not sure

http://media.spokesman.com/photos/2014/ ... df6a374511

Collaring and tagging an awake wolf pup

https://fns.areavoices.com/in-search-of-wolf-pups/

Pulling wolf pups out of a den for health checks

http://www.vnews.com/Minn-Researchers-S ... al-1832928

Weighing a Wolf Pup

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/465067098993326260/

Bear biologist posing with a black bear which I assume is sedated. They had apparently previously weighed the bear.

http://www.wallowavalleyonline.com/home ... f-biology/


And those are just some of the pics of the biologist touching the wolves. There's also two more pages on the site linked above.

And this is a link about Mexican Gray Wolves:
http://canislupus101.blogspot.com/2016/ ... ation.html


Veterinarian training wildlife biologists how to draw blood, give vaccines, measure teeth, etc.


Biologist carrying wolf to a field station for radio collar replacement


Biologist with wolf in a vehicle of some sort (probably a car, but not sure)


Weighing the wolf


Measuring the wolf's teeth


Measuring the wolf's paws


Not sure exactly what they are doing here, but still touching the wolf


Vaccinating the wolf

And finally, though not touching the wolf anymore, releasing the wolf from a kennel back into the wild to be reunited with his pack:

Since most of these sites kept referring to the people pictured as biologists like wolf biologist, wildlife biologist, field biologist, or even just general biologist, etc. , I'm thinking that the major I'm looking for would probably be more Wildlife Biology rather than Zoology.

Also, while googling, I managed to find this pretty helpful site, but haven't finished reading all of it yet:
http://www.aboutbioscience.org/careers/mammalogist

I did briefly consider a career as an exotic or zoo vet, but I can't watch the surgery parts of any of the vet shows I watch without feeling queasy. Wildlife biologists seem to get to do alot of the same things a vet would do for routine care of animals like vaccinate them, draw blood, weigh them, check their health etc., but don't have to do surgery. However, I know for wildlife biologists, its only an occassional thing whereas for vets, its an every day thing, but vets also have to do surgery and mostly only get to work with domestic animals unless a zoo vet or a vet that specifically prohibits cats and dogs from going their like Dr. K The Exotic Pet Vet on the Nat Geo Wild show at that clinic in Florida.

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Topic starter Posted : July 26, 2016 3:35 pm
sarajeku
Noble Member

Most of what I read about zoologist and wildlife biologist (which I still don't quite understand the difference on) are that they study animals in the wild, but keep a safe distance from them and have no direct interactions. I don't know about wildlife biologists, but I also read that most of the time as a zoologist is not spent with animals, but actually collecting data and writing research papers and only like two months out of the year are actually spent "in the field" so to speak. So, that doesn't really sound like what any of the people listed above do.

If you are studying an animal "in the field" (aka in the wild) and collecting data, you would not have any interaction with that animal at all.

However, I realize most of what I wrote above would have little to no hands on stuff. Sometimes wildlife biologist get to hold sedated wolves for weight, medical checks, drawing blood, etc., but that's about it and I don't think it happens very often because otherwise it would be stressful for the animals. Also, sometimes they might be able to pick-up pups from a den unsedated and give them health checks, weight, count the number of pups, etc. , but again, that wouldn't be very often either and I can't imagine they'd be able to do that without first getting the parents away somehow or sedating the parents.

I guess what I really want to do though is like what Jim and Jamie Dutcher did where the lived among a pack of wolves and interacted directly with them, but I'm not sure you can even get a job doing that.

All of the pictures you posted show sedated animals so I'm not sure what kind of point you were making with those pictures since we already know those jobs exist.
It seems what you want to do is interact with the animals, not just touch them, so those pictures seem a little pointless to me.

People who do these things are doing it because they are passionate about the science behind it and the knowledge gained from the study or observations. Not just going out and watching animals. And you are probably never going to touch an animal if you get into one of these fields, and study live wild animals. Most of these studies are done with the strict requisite that no human contact is made with the animals in order to preserve a natural environment in which to observe natural behavior. Otherwise your entire study could be flawed and dismissed.

^^ This is absolutely correct.

I have a degree in animal science and a second degree in psychology. As of right now I am a therapist (using the psych degree) but before this job, I spent years interning, volunteering and working at sanctuaries (with no pay) and of those, only one allowed contact with some of the animals. The vast majority of the time spent there was shoveling poop, feeding, watering, and other general maintenance.

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Posted : July 28, 2016 3:15 pm
TamanduaGirl
Admin Admin

Kinda fits the discussion http://theconversation.com/even-scienti ... ldnt-61252
"Even scientists take selfies with wild animals. Here’s why they shouldn’t."

"we do not have permission, or good reason, to engage in recreational activities with our animal subjects – including restraining them for selfies."

"To receive these privileges, scientists submit proposals for review by ethics committees that decide whether the projects have valid scientific goals and whether the methods are ethical and humane. Details vary, but generally approvals require that the number of animals handled and handling times are minimized, and that animals are treated humanely and with respect."

Also "Moreover, the photos do not reveal that many sampling procedures injure or kill some of the animals that are captured for study and that research proposals include acceptable numbers of casualties."

Yes wild animals die from the stress of being captured and/or drugged.

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Posted : July 28, 2016 3:29 pm
caninesrock
Noble Member

If you are studying an animal "in the field" (aka in the wild) and collecting data, you would not have any interaction with that animal at all.

All of the pictures you posted show sedated animals so I'm not sure what kind of point you were making with those pictures since we already know those jobs exist.
It seems what you want to do is interact with the animals, not just touch them, so those pictures seem a little pointless to me.

Technically, touching an animal, even a sedated animal, is a form of interaction. It's just a very limited form of interaction. While yes, I would prefer to interact with conscious animals, if that is not possible, I"m willing to do a job where atleast at minimum I get to touch the animals. That's more than I'd ever been able to do a zoo keeper where you're not ever allowed to touch the animals at all, so still much better.

I do love science. Some of my favorite subjects that I took in high school were Biology, Animal Science(though here in Texas, Animal Science is all about livestock and the Ag industry. Not sure if that's what it is in other states.), Intro to Vet Tech, and Canine science. Also, other classes I liked and were good at were English, which I'm sure would be relevant to scientific studies since you have to write papers and stuff, World History and World Geography which would be helpful if I ended up studying animals in other countries, and Creative Writing which might possibly also be helpful with writing, but that was more about fictional writing, so probably not as helpful as regular English classes, which I was in Honors English all throughout High School and took Honors Biology as well. Now, Chemistry and Physics, however, I was never too fond of, especially not Physics and I've also never been good at or fond of more advanced maths, so that could be a problem. I know in science you have to do alot of Math. Though, it seems at least that biology doesn't require quite as much Math as the other sciences. If it only requires basic Math like adding, subtracting, dividing, multiplying, making graphs and charts, etc., I'll do fine, but I'm almost totally clueless when it comes to Geometry and Algebra is hit or miss with me with some parts being super easy and others being really confusing and frustrating. As for my college, my favorite classes were once again biology and every written class I took in the Zoo Technology Program which I don't remember them all anymore, but range from everything from classes on captive animal management to animal nutrition to evolution, or atleast covered all those things if they weren't specifically about them. In my free time, I also read scientific articles about the taxonomy of canids and have a whole book on the evolutionary ancestry of canids that I've read front to back. I read tons of these books for fun like most people would read a fictional novel. Most people would probably find the books and articles I read boring, but I find them highly fascinating.

Also, yes, I know Wildlife Biology and Zoology are not just about watching nor playing with or getting to touch animals. I know there is much more involved. I guess I should've explained more on exactly what my goal is. I think wild canids in general no matter if a fox, wolf, coyote, or dingo, get a bad wrap. They're either blamed as livestock killers, man-eaters, or both. One of my reasons of hoping to open up my own canid zoo one day is to have it serve as an educational facility to get people to appreciate these amazing animals and stop seeing them as pests or man-killers. While yes, it's true that canids may occasionally kill livestock, they much prefer wild game if its available to them and hasn't all been run off by humans and their livestock causing the problem in the first place. And yes, canids have been known to occasionally kill humans but it's quite rare in comparison to other carnivore and omnivore species and most cases are when the humans go into the animals' territory. It's not like a wolf or coyote is going to just jump into your window and maul you to death. I want people to understand these things and realize that people and canids can co-exist together as long as we take preferably non-lethal steps to prevent, avoid, or lessen conflicts between them. I would theoretically like to do this with trained and socialized captive canids of various species raised from pups. Think something along the lines of Wolf Park, but with other canids that have been given bad wraps as well like dingoes which are also accused livestock killers and jackals which are seen as only lowly scavengers and thieves sadly when they are really amazing animals. I realize that something like my park would take many years of saving up and many years of experience with canids, which is why a job like the people pictured above with the sedated wolves is something that I'm willing to use as my starting point. My main problem, however, is that I don't know if those people shown are Wildlife Biologists or Zoologists. I've seen some colleges that offer degrees in Wildlife Biology and some that offer degrees in Zoology, but I don't know which of the degrees I should get. Does anyone know which one would be better?

But basically, my plan would go like this:
-Go to college for my bachelors and then my master in either zoology or wildlife biology. (Not sure which one yet.)

-Work for the federal (like FWS) or state gov (think DNR or Parks and Wildlife Deparment of whatever state I end up living in) studying endangered wildlife such as gray or red wolves, grizzlies, or wolverines,etc. Though I prefer canids, I'm pretty much willing to work with anything I can get as long as it's a meat-eating mammal of some sort while I bid my time waiting for some kind of canid position to come open. I read that these are the kinds of jobs that biologists have, so if that's the case I'm thinking maybe Wildlife Biology would be a better degree to get, but I'm afraid it would be too specialized whereas a Zoology degree would be more broad and general and would open more positions for me, but I'm not sure if it would let me get a job as a government biologist that does things like study wolves in Yellowstone for example or not. I suppose I could always try to find a school that happens to have both and double major or get my bachelors in one and my masters in the other to be on the safe side, but I don't know for sure. I read for both that its best to have atleast a master because there's heavy competition for the positions and many people have masters. Sometimes, people have PHDs in Zoology, but I read that's only necessary if you want to teach at a college or university or be able to do independent research. Just a masters should get you most jobs in both and usually Wildlife Biology only requires a bachelors, but a masters might help to beat the competition out when trying to get hired.

-After working for the fed or state gov studying animals in the wild for anywhere from 20-40 years and having put whatever money I could spare into savings, use my savings to retire from my government job, buy a house and property if don't already have one, and start building my zoo/educational facility with my savings.

-Then, once my facilities are built, do everything I need to get the necessary permits.

-Acquire my animals.

-Open to the public and start educating them about canids.

- Maybe somewhere far down the road when my facility has been open many years and has gained credibility, apply for permission from the government to help with the breeding of endangered canids like Red Wolves, African Wild Dogs, and Maned Wolves, and maybe Dholes if I could somehow get the Invasive Species Permit. Obviously, none of these animals would be socialized or have direct interactions with the public since they are all endangered and in the case of the Red Wolves, their offspring may be released back into the wild, so I can't have them passing down tame/ socialized genes through the generations.

I have a degree in animal science and a second degree in psychology. As of right now I am a therapist (using the psych degree) but before this job, I spent years interning, volunteering and working at sanctuaries (with no pay) and of those, only one allowed contact with some of the animals. The vast majority of the time spent there was shoveling poop, feeding, watering, and other general maintenance.

That would be why I decided against wanting to work with captive animals unless it was a place I owned myself. So little actually has to do with the animals. At least with wild animals, everything you do is somewhat related to the animal. Yes, things like feeding animals and cleaning their poop is related to them, but you frequently have to do stuff that has zilch to do with the animals as a zoo-keeper like pull weeds, rake leaves, pick up litter, mow the grounds, etc.
That's one of the major reasons that I decided against it.

The other reason was that I think AZA is a huge hypocrite from what I learned about them in my zoo program and they don't care about the animals or conservation as much as they say they do. As much as they'd like to deny it, its more about the public than the animals in most major zoos. For example, how many zoos have you gone to and seen one of the endangered small wild cat species? Many of these cats are endangered, threatened, near threatened, or vulnerable, but not many zoos bother to breed them and help with conservation because people don't go to the zoo to see something that looks like their average house cat. The zoos would rather have things like tigers and lions, which while they are endangered in the wild, are very, very common in the captivity. The small cat species are dying out however since they aren't common in either place and the zoos don't seem to care.

Another thing is that they have surplus animals which they would frequently either euthanize do to having no use of them for conversation/breeding purposes anymore or send them off to brokers where they have an unknown fate and could even end up in canned hunts.

Also, as far conservation, how many zoos do you know that actually release their animals back into the wild? If they're just going to keep them and all their offspring in captivity anyway, how is that any different than what individual owners and non-accredited zoos do?

You know those amazing naturalistic enclosures that zoos keep their animals in? Well, many times all the plants and trees and rocks, etc. are totally 100% fake and even if real,its' a common practice in many zoos for them to put hot wire on the plants to stop the animals from interacting with them so they don't destroy the plants. The fact is that those enclosures are not for the animals at all, but just there to appease the public. The animals would be just as happy in a cement enclosure with enrichment as they would in an enclosure filled with fake plants or real plants and hotwire that they aren't allowed to interact with at all anyway.

Even though the zoo program I took in Florida didn't work out for me, I still don't regret taking it. It made me realize that I never want to work for an accredited zoo because they're all huge hypocrites who don't really care as much about the animals or conservation as they say they do.

I'd much rather work studying animals in the wild where I know I'm actually helping with conservation and making a difference and where it's more about the well-being of the animals than about appeasing the public at the expense of the animals' health and well-being.

That being said, I sadly can't rid myself of the desire or habit to go view animals in the accredited zoos despite now knowing some of the bad things they do "in secret"/ "behind the scenes", but I can take comfort in the fact that atleast I'm not working for them. It's not my fault that my desire to see things like Red Pandas, Giant Pandas, and Red Wolves that can't be seen anywhere else but in these so-called "accredited" zoos, makes me go to them.

As for sanctuaries, I'm not as against the idea of them. Legitimate sanctuaries usually do care about the well-being of their individual animals. The problem is its hard to tell a legitimate sanctuary or rescue from one that isn't. For example, on the surface, Big Cat Rescue looks like it could be legitimate if you visited them in person and hadn't read anything about them. But if you read about them on the internet, you realize they aren't as legitimate as they claim.

As for hands-on work, it think it really depends on the sanctuary. Generally, when looking at sanctuaries, I try to look for ones that offer animals encounters to the public because if they even let the public interact with them, then it would make sense that they should let the volunteers and interns interact with them. Had I reached 18 before I quit volunteering there, I would have been allowed to go in with the wolfdogs at Saint Francis Wolf Sanctuary after the proper training. Also, places like Wolf Park, Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center, Wild Wolf Spirit, and Sea Crest Wolf Preserve, all offer animal encounters to the public. Maybe you just picked the wrong sanctuaries to volunteer at?

https://www.wildspiritwolfsanctuary.org/encounters.php

http://wolfpark.org/education/seminars/

http://www.wolfeducation.org/#!tour-pricing/c1i9u

http://www.seacrestwolfpreserve.org/visit.php

http://www.saintfrancissanctuary.org/visiting-vip.htm

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Topic starter Posted : August 2, 2016 4:15 pm
caninesrock
Noble Member

@TG: While it may be true that the animals might sometimes die from stress, the article that it links to is about a study in which sharks were intentionally killed for study that couldn't be done on live sharks. In any career with animals, there's always going be somewhat of a risk for death since they are living creatures. Even if I had chose to pursue being a vet instead, many animals would no doubt die under my care, maybe even as a result of something going wrong in the surgery, so in that case, being my fault as well. Even as an animal breeder, animals may die from miscarriages going wrong, complications while giving birth, or may kill their own babies. Just owning animals may also require having to kill animals for their food either directly or in directly. As long as the animals dying is not common or often, I don't see it as being any different from the risks of any career involving animals. Anything involving life and life sciences is going to involve death at least to some degree since the two are intertwined and there's really no way to escape it.

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Topic starter Posted : August 2, 2016 4:23 pm
sarajeku
Noble Member

It sounds like you have your mind made up, no matter what anyone says. Good luck.

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Posted : August 2, 2016 8:59 pm
caninesrock
Noble Member

So, it seems like both Wildlife Biology and Zoology degrees require physics, chemistry, and several maths. Go figure. I guess I'll have to brush up on those. I am also aware that I would have to give up pets of any kind, even domestics, to pursue such a career since I can not leave pets home alone for months at a time while I'm out in the field. I have two colleges I'm really considering at the moment. I wonder if anyone knows anything about either and which one would be better?

University of Wyoming
http://www.uwyo.edu/as/majors-and-minors/

Right now, I'm leaning towards this one since it has degrees in both Zoology and Wildlife & Fisheries Biology Management (which I think is the same as Wildlife Biology, but not 100% sure). I think on maybe either seeing if I can double major in both or take one as a major and one as a minor if possible.

Another school I'm considering is one in Wisconsin called Northlands, but that only offers a degree in Fisheries and Wildlife Ecology and I'm not sure how useful that will be or if it counts towards Wildlife Biology?

https://www.northland.edu/study/academi ... resources/

Exotic Wishlist: high content wolfdog or wolf,Coyote or Coydog, Black-backed Jackal, New Guinea Singing Dog, Red Fox

Domestic Wishlist: dogs, ferrets,

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Topic starter Posted : August 2, 2016 9:36 pm
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