Notifications
Clear all

Animals You Want in the Pet Trade, But Aren't

Page 1 / 2
caninesrock
Noble Member

Well, like the title says, animals you want in the pet trade but aren't? Maybe even animals you might consider importing and breeding. Try to stay away from things like endangered and invasive species that aren't even possible to be owned and keep the list realistic if possible please.

Animals I would love to import and breed for the pet trade are:

Golden Jackals

African Golden Wolves https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_golden_wolf

Eastern Coyote/Coywolf

Culpeo

Fisher(weasel species)

Least Weasel

Stoat (also known as an Ermine or Short-tailed Weasel)

Beech Marten

American Marten

(European) Pine Marten

Welsh Polecat (subspecies of polecat. Not sure if the main subspecies in the pet trade can also come in these colors or not though. Most of the ones I see look in the common European Polecats look similar to domestic ferrets.)

Durrell's Mongoose (Also known as a Durell's Vontsira) (Not a true mongoose and actually more truly related to fossa, so I don't think they'd be banned under the invasive species act, but not sure. Their genus is Salanoia and the family is Eupleridae. Still if trying to import, might be better to put Vontsira as the common name rather than mongoose.) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salanoia_durrelli

Colocolo (also known as Pantanal Cat?)

Amur Leopard Cat (subspecies of Asian Leopard Cat)

European Wildcat

Scottish Wildcat

Exotic Wishlist: high content wolfdog or wolf,Coyote or Coydog, Black-backed Jackal, New Guinea Singing Dog, Red Fox

Domestic Wishlist: dogs, ferrets,

Quote
Topic starter Posted : July 24, 2016 5:25 pm
TamanduaGirl
Admin Admin

Slender mongoose both species but like the blond morph best

Ringtailed mongoose
Any of the stripped mongooses

Photos in the old mongoose chat thread viewtopic.php?f=18&t=8808#p79164

Blanford's fox

Blond Tayras

yapok/water possum

Cuban Hutia

paca, kind of exist in the pet rade but captive bred is super rare so actual pet is kind of not existent

Japanese flying squirrels, allowed in my state while others aren't but no one has them anywhere

also the giant flying squirrels

American badgers and wolverinesplus some of the mustalids CaninesRock listed, pike martens and weasels.

Springhares/springhaas but some people do have them so maybe some day but right now right now if you want a pet you wont find a breeder so fits the list.

And one unrealistic because I'd really love it, numbat

My fennec fox site: http://tiny-foxes.com
My anteater site: http://www.livingwithanteaters.com

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/TamanduaGirl

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 24, 2016 6:01 pm
Ash
 Ash
Admin Admin

Going to say the obvious first: aardwolves.

Maned wolves

African wild dogs

Jaguarundi

Platypus

Clouded leopard

Komodo dragon

Red panda

The only feasible one is the aardwolf since the others are endangered, and the platypus is in Australia. Komodos are able to be acquired, but like giant pandas, are owned by their native governments regardless of where born or bred.

I'm Fable and Ifrit's mommy. Also mommy to Carousel, Breeze, and a bunch of snakes, lizards, and spiders. Oh, and one amphibian!

ReplyQuote
Posted : August 8, 2016 1:30 pm
caninesrock
Noble Member

I forgot to mention Quolls. They're the closest thing to Tasmanian Devils that can actually be acquired. I'd love to own a Tasmanian Devil, but I know that's never going to happen since they are only found in Tasmania and are endangered. Would also like numbats and wombats, but again, that's not going to happen since both are found only in Australia. And thylacines are sadly extinct, so also not possible. In addition to Quolls which can be found in New Guinea, there are some species of Tree Kangaroos which can also be found in New Guinea that I kind of wish could be found in the pet trade.

Exotic Wishlist: high content wolfdog or wolf,Coyote or Coydog, Black-backed Jackal, New Guinea Singing Dog, Red Fox

Domestic Wishlist: dogs, ferrets,

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : August 17, 2016 10:02 pm
minervasden
Member Moderator

Ferret badgers, any species but especially Chinese/Melogale moschata. They are fairly cute, of very manageable size (under 7 pounds) and not adverse to living in close proximity to humans. In fact, in some areas ferret badgers are encouraged to enter homes for pest control purposes.

Ferret badgers do use the defense of shooting the contents of their anal glands at attacker. As with other species using similar tactics, this behavior would likely greatly lessen/cease in tamed individuals. Also, why would you want to invite wild ones into your home if they were quick to jump to this action?

I stay in the dark because too much light will blind you

ReplyQuote
Posted : August 18, 2016 12:46 pm
caninesrock
Noble Member

Forgot to put pics of Tree Kangaroos and Quolls:

There's only two quolls found outside of Australia. Sadly, my favorite, the Tiger/Spotted Tail Quoll isn't one of them. However, the New Guinean Quoll looks somewhat similar to it.

New Guinean Quoll:

Bronze Quoll:

https://www.science.unsw.edu.au/news/di ... ost-aussie

Doria's Tree Kangaroo

Goodfellow's Tree Kangaroo

Matchsie's Tree Kangaroo

Golden Mantled Tree Kangaroo

Tenkile Tree Kangaroo

Ursine Tree Kangaroo

And finally, my absolute favorite, mostly because they look like little bear cubs:
Dingiso

I also wish a ton of species of true possums (as in the ones from Australia, not opposums that are commonly mislabeled as possums) were available, but there's too many to list. One of my favorites has got to be the Brushtailed Possum, though, since they are fairly large as far true possums go. Also, they're easy to find since they are an invasive species in New Guinea where there are millions of them:

Edit: Darn. Just saw all Brushtail Possums are banned federally on the injurious wildlife/invasive species list, probably because they became invasive in New Guinea. But maybe there are other large species of possum that can be found outside of Australia since Brushtail seem to be the only ones specifically banned.

Also, more species of Cuscus would be nice.

Actually, make that more marsupials in general. As far as I know, the only marsupials in the pet trade are Opossums (mostly Virginia, but occasionally Short-tailed and Four-Eyed), Kangaroos (but not tree kangaroos sadly), Wallabies, Sugar Gliders, and rarely, a Cuscus, but usually not pet quality as far as I can tell and I'm not sure, but I think its only one species of Cuscus that ever pops up.

@minervasden: I forgot about Ferret-Badgers. They are definitely something I would want if they were available. As for the spraying, I imagine breeders would start descenting them like they do with skunks.

Exotic Wishlist: high content wolfdog or wolf,Coyote or Coydog, Black-backed Jackal, New Guinea Singing Dog, Red Fox

Domestic Wishlist: dogs, ferrets,

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : August 18, 2016 2:39 pm
TamanduaGirl
Admin Admin

There are bettongs but since on endangered list not easy to come by. I'd have one now though if it wasn't for my state's corrupt board.

Ferret badgers are on my list but I didn't want to make a list for mustalids since it would be so long.

My fennec fox site: http://tiny-foxes.com
My anteater site: http://www.livingwithanteaters.com

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/TamanduaGirl

ReplyQuote
Posted : August 18, 2016 3:16 pm
naja-naja
Reputable Member

oenpelli pythons. not sure of their status but they only occur on aboriginal land/reserves in australia so can't even be captured and kept there and even if they were they can't be exported.

ReplyQuote
Posted : October 1, 2016 3:24 pm
Peacefulward
Honorable Member Pats Friends

A few endangered animals are in my list; these are just what I think would be cool to have in the pet trade one day when their populations are stable. Smile

Golden lion tamarins

Flying fox

Spotted skunk

African civet

Black footed ferret

Paraguyan Wooly Mouse

3 Dogs, 2 horses, 1 donkey, ducks, chickens, and a coatimundi currently

Exotic "wishlist": red fox, gray fox, bat eared fox, mink, sand cat, owl (any species).

ReplyQuote
Posted : October 6, 2016 10:30 pm
Ash
 Ash
Admin Admin

You can get spotted skunks here. They used to be quite abundant, but didn't make as good of pets as the striped did. Tiny Tracks used to breed them, I believe.

I'm Fable and Ifrit's mommy. Also mommy to Carousel, Breeze, and a bunch of snakes, lizards, and spiders. Oh, and one amphibian!

ReplyQuote
Posted : October 7, 2016 2:36 pm
TexasYankee
Estimable Member

Don't feel like posting pictures right now, for reasons that will become apparent when you see how long my list is. Want to get it off my chest and I may post pictures of some or all of these later.

I'd like to see crested couas, roadrunners and other non-parasitic members of the cuckoo family in the pet trade.

I'd like to see a wider variety of barbets in the pet trade (I've seen only four species for sale, which considering the diversity of barbets leaves out a lot of species I'd like to see, particularly the toucan barbet and fire-tufted barbet). Since toucans are nested within the clade which includes barbets, I imagine a lot of them would have similar personalities to toucans, but would avoid the specialized fruit diet that toucans need.

There's an adorable relative of the barn owl called the Oriental bay owl which I wish were in the pet trade.

I'd like to see cuckoo rollers in the pet trade. They're large, friendly-looking birds, from Madagascar with no close relatives.

While mousebirds are still in the pet trade, they're on the verge of dying out in the pet trade in the US; you can't get them here. Also on the topic of birds you can't get in the US but are in the pet trade: horned parakeets and keas.

The kagu isn't endangered enough that it couldn't be bred for the pet trade, and people in New Caledonia kept them as pets until that was outlawed. Its relative the sunbittern might also make a neat pet.

And speaking of New Caledonia, I really want a New Caledonian crow. I don't think they are in the pet trade. Corvids in general are neat and I'd love to see some more tropical jays. And in Australia, there's a teddy bear-sized crow relative called the apostlebird which seems like it might make a good pet.

Most of New Zealand's native birds are endangered now, but the bellbird, rifleman, and tui are all very neat birds listed as species of least concern. And yet the government of New Zealand won't even let foreign zoos have these birds.

I second the ringtailed mongoose and would also add the broad-striped and narrow-striped mongooses. None of them are true mongooses so they're legal in the US; all are neat looking.

I also second the spotted quoll, or any quolls. I'd also like to see bandicoots, especially eastern barred bandicoots in the pet trade. I'd also like to see the monito del monte in the pet trade, though it apparently hibernates which might make it not a great pet.

Oh, and koalas aren't endangered, and while they need a specialized diet, so do anteaters. As I kid I was taught that they don't make good pets because they'll tear your face off, but that seems to be no more true of them than any other animal: you need to mishandle them first. I wouldn't want one myself but wish they were in the pet trade.

I'm surprised nobody's mentioned red pandas and clouded leopards. They're endangered, yes, but that's mostly an issue with habitat loss. Wouldn't want a clouded leopard myself and am ambivalent on red pandas, but wish they were in the pet trade. Also, while we're back on carnivores: South American "foxes."

I want to second Springhares (though I think that Europe still has them, don't they?) and their relatives the flying-squirrel-like anomalures would be fun. Anomalures aren't in the pet trade anywhere.

While we're on the topic of rodents, the recently-discovered Laotian rock rat seems pretty neat.

Flying lemurs and tree shrews are both animals I'd like to try keeping. Flying lemurs so far haven't bred well in zoos, which doesn't mean they're unsuitable as pets.

Moonrats are neat-looking relatives of the hedgehogs. I kind of want one and definitely wish they were available in the pet trade.

Are pangolins available in the pet trade? I know that their body parts are being traded illegally, but what about live animals?

The big one for me with mammals is bats. I wish that bats other than flying foxes and Egyptian fruit bats were available in the pet trade. In particular, I wish that the sucker-footed bat from Madagascar were in the pet trade.

I also wish that mouse lemurs and aye-ayes were in the pet trade. Again, aye-ayes are endangered because of habitat loss, though the fact that zoos don't have them makes me wonder if they're tricky to breed.

The only reptile which doesn't seem to be in the pet trade but I strongly wish were is the armadillo girdled lizard of South Africa.

ReplyQuote
Posted : November 17, 2016 12:29 am
TamanduaGirl
Admin Admin

Speaking of rodents. Cloud rats. Oregon allows them but I know of no one breeding them any more though Ken used to so maybe they are out there somewhere hiding. https://c2.staticflickr.com/4/3235/2880 ... c21b_b.jpg

I know of at least a couple people with springhaas but I don't know if there are enough out there to make them available again.

I think the non-frugivore bats are harder to care for is why you don't see them.

No pangolins. They are hard to care for and breed.

My fennec fox site: http://tiny-foxes.com
My anteater site: http://www.livingwithanteaters.com

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/TamanduaGirl

ReplyQuote
Posted : November 17, 2016 1:39 am
TexasYankee
Estimable Member

I've never heard of cloud rats, but they're quite cute. The good news is that cloud rats are from the Philippines, so they could hypothetically be imported to the US. Add them to the long list of "animals to try and import when I find a job that pays well and gives me a lot of vacation time."

ReplyQuote
Posted : November 17, 2016 8:16 am
Ash
 Ash
Admin Admin

The red pandas and clouded leopards would be amazing! The non-AZA Aquarium here in Utah obtained a pair of clouded leopards, so that gives me some hope that they could possibly one day be given to an approved USDA-licensed facility at least.

I bet you could probably get some bats of other species, but you'd have to be the pioneer. Insectivores are going to be harder to feed usually than frugivores, but is entirely doable with diet substitutions.

I'm Fable and Ifrit's mommy. Also mommy to Carousel, Breeze, and a bunch of snakes, lizards, and spiders. Oh, and one amphibian!

ReplyQuote
Posted : November 17, 2016 8:18 am
TexasYankee
Estimable Member

The leaf-nosed bats of the New World display a wide variety of dietary behaviors. They eat not just insects but also blood, fruit, and nectar. There is also one species of vesper bat that primarily eats fish, and several others that eat fish opportunistically. Blood would be the most difficult of these, but it's probably not an insuperable issue. I imagine there are some people who would be happy to feed pet vampire bats on their own blood, but I'm not one of them.

One of the issues I've heard about keeping insectivorous bats is that they need to eat all their food on the wing. However given the diversity of insectivorous bats, I bet that at least some bats can be trained to eat live food that doesn't fly. And even for ones that can't, mealworms become moths. There's one species of insectivorous bat that roots around for grubs in the ground. It's my favorite bat, but sadly it's an endangered animal in New Zealand and will never become part of the pet trade.

ReplyQuote
Posted : November 17, 2016 8:37 am
Page 1 / 2
Share: